Detroit Traffic Lawyers Explain Fleeing & Eluding Penalties

Detroit Traffic Lawyers Explain
Fleeing & Eluding a Police Officer

Fleeing and Eluding is a serious traffic violation issued when a person driving a vehicle “willfully” fails to obey a lawful police signal or command to stop. There are actually 4 types or “degrees” of fleeing and eluding under Michigan law – however all are felonies.

In this article our experienced Detroit Traffic Lawyers explain the types of feeling and eluding, the penalties for each offense.

What Is Fleeing & Eluding?

Under Michigan law, anyone who is given a signal by a police office  – by hand, voice, flashing lights, siren, or any another visual or audible signal – must stop their vehicle. It is important to note that increasing the speed of the vehicle, turning off the headlights, or otherwise appearing to attempt to flee the officer, can be considered fleeing and eluding.

The officer signaling must be in uniform, and he or she must be in an identifiable police (or DNR) vehicle when commanding the stop. If the officer is not in uniform and/or is not in an identifiable police vehicle you are not required to stop.

Four Degrees of Fleeing and Eluding:

1st Degree Fleeing & Eluding in Michigan

If death occurs while failing to stop for a police officer, a person can be charged with fleeing and eluding in the first degree. This is a very serious a felony charge.

Penalty: For 1st degree fleeing and eluding a person is facing a felony criminal record, up to 15 years in prison, a fine of up to $5000.

2nd Degree Fleeing & Eluding in Michigan

If serious injury occurs, while failing to stop for a police officer, a person can be charged with fleeing and eluding in the second degree.

Penalty: For 2nd degree fleeing and eluding a person is facing a felony criminal record, up to 10 years in prison, a fine of up to $5000, and driver’s license revocation.

3rd Degree Fleeing & Eluding in Michigan

If a collision occurs, or if the violation takes place in part in any area with a speed limit under 35 miles per hour, while failing to stop for a police officer, a person can be charged with fleeing and eluding in the third degree.

Penalty: For 3rd degree fleeing and eluding a person is facing a felony criminal record, up to 5 years in prison, a fine of up to $1000, and suspension of their driver’s license.

4th Degree Fleeing & Eluding in Michigan

If none of the requirements for 1st through 3rd (above) are met – but a person has still failed to obey a police officer’s command to stop, a person can be charged with fleeing and eluding in the fourth degree.

Penalty: For 4th degree fleeing and eluding a person is facing a felony criminal record, up to 2 years in prison, a fine of up to $500, and suspension of their driver’s license.

Best Detroit Traffic Lawyers

Our experienced Detroit traffic lawyers know that there’s “two sides to every situation” – and that there are often many additional details that should be presented in a fleeing and eluding case.
Our lawyers will examine every detail of your case, and present a strong defense to achieve the best possible result in your fleeing and eluding case.

Read more about how our lawyers fight fleeing and eluding cases HERE.

 

If you are facing a fleeing and eluding charge in Detroit, Wayne County, Oakland County or Southeast Michigan our experienced lawyers will fight for you. Call us today for free consultation.

Detroit Traffic Lawyers: 800-717-4757